Faculty by Research Area

Evolutionary Ecology

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Ambrose Ambrose,  Stanley

ambrose@illinois.edu
217-244-3504

Professor
PEEC

Photo Bell,  Alison

alisonmb@illinois.edu
439 Morrill Hall
217-265-5469

Associate Professor; Affiliate, Institute for Genomic Biology; Member, Neuroscience Program
Animal Biology, PEEC

Maybe Berenbaum,  May

maybe@illinois.edu
216A Morrill Hall / 318B Morrill Hall
217-333-2910 / 217-333-7784

Professor & Head, Swanlund Chair
Entomology, PEEC

Jbrawn Brawn,  Jeffrey

jbrawn@illinois.edu
W-503 Turner Hall
217-244-5937

Professor and Head, NRES
Animal Biology, PEEC

Clancy Clancy,  Kathryn

kclancy@illinois.edu
109 Davenport Hall
217-244-1509

Associate Professor
PEEC, Animal Biology

Fuller Fuller,  Becky

rcfuller@illinois.edu
104 Shelford Vivarium
217-333-9065

Associate Professor
Animal Biology, PEEC

P garber Garber,  Paul

p-garber@illinois.edu
Dept. of Anthropology, Davenport Hall
217-333-3616

Professor Emeritus
PEEC

No photo Hanks,  Lawrence

hanks@illinois.edu

Professor
Entomology, PEEC

Kheath Heath,  Katy

kheath@illinois.edu
249 Morrill Hall
217-265-5473

Associate Professor
School of Integrative Biology, Plant Biology, PEEC

My research focuses on the evolution of mutualisms, which are most generally defined as species interactions that increase the fitness of both (or all) partners. Mutualisms are ubiquitous! And they include some of the most important species interactions in nature (for example: mitochondria, mycorrhizae, gut endosymbionts). Though, at first impression, these friendly interactions might appear tightly coevolved, instead they may be characterized by temporal and spatial heterogeneity, cheating, even evolutionary instability. I try to take a multidisciplinary approach and use diverse methods that traditionally are associated with the fields of quantitative genetics (multivariate statistics, greenhouse experiments), population and molecular genetics (genotyping, sequence analysis, expression assays), and ecology (field manipulations, collections) to understand multiple aspects of the evolution of mutualisms. Some questions currently motivating my work include: 1. Under what conditions (including the abiotic and biotic environment) do mutualisms evolve, remain stable, or break down?&nbsp; 2. How phenotypically and genetically variable are mutualistic interactions, and why is such variation maintained, despite selective pressure to cheat or, alternatively, to remain honest? 3. Which genes are variable in nature, and which are, or have been, important players in coevolution? Most generally, I am interested in plants, microbes, and their sundry interactions. Most of my research focuses on the interactions between legumes and their symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, called rhizobia. This includes the <em>Medicago-Sinorhizobium</em> mutualism because it is a great genetic model with an interesting ecology. I also have interests/projects in: the agronomically-important soybean-<em>Bradyrhizobium</em> interaction, invasive/naturalized clover-rhizobium interactions, invasive/naturalized <em>Medicago lupulina</em>-<em>Sinorhizobium </em>interactions, and the native prairie legume <em>Chamaecrista fasciculata</em> and associated rhizobia.
Kpjohnso Johnson,  Kevin

kpjohnso@illinois.edu
284 Natural Resources Building, 607 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign, IL 61820
217-244-9267

Affiliate, Principal Ornithologist
Animal Biology, Entomology, INHS, PEEC

Photo Paige,  Ken

k-paige@illinois.edu
483 Morrill Hall
217-333-7802

Professor
Animal Biology, PEEC

Philipp Philipp,  David

philipp@illinois.edu
237 NRSA
217-369-2952

Research Affiliate
Animal Biology, PEEC

Photo Punyasena,  Surangi

spunya1@illinois.edu
139 Morrill Hall
217-244-8049

Associate Professor
Plant Biology, PEEC

My research focuses on the role that climate has played in the long-term evolution of Neotropical forests, primarily through the reconstruction of paleoecological and macroevolutionary trends of individual plant clades from the fossil pollen record. Despite its modest standing in the popular imagination, fossil pollen is an ideal source for paleoecological information. The palynological record is one of the most ubiquitous terrestrial fossil records. Pollen and spores are abundant, resist degradation, and are found at the bottom of most water bodies, past or present. For this reason, the palynological record is expressly suited for quantitative analyses of continuous, long-term trends in plant ecology and evolution, including time-series analysis of origination and extinction rates, migration, and functional morphological evolution. Paleoecological analyses complement neo-ecological approaches to the study of Neotropical forest composition, diversity, and structure, providing extensive temporal information that is unattainable through other forms of investigation. My approach to understanding the relationship between plant diversity and climate has been multifaceted, investigating both modern spatial and Holocene/Late Quaternary temporal patterns in Neotropical vegetation. Current research includes (1) exploring Quaternary and deep-time (pre-Quaternary) patterns of tropical plant diversity, ecology, and evolutionary change; (2) developing and applying quantitative vegetation models of paleotemperature and paleoprecipitation; and (3) developing quantitative measures of pollen morphology. The aim of this interdisciplinary research program is to develop a temporal picture of tropical forest evolution in order to better understand how community composition and functional ecology are affected by climatic change. The results provide a means of testing regional and global climate models, as well as predicting the response of tropical forests to anthropogenic climate forcing.
Jrhodes Rhodes,  Justin

jrhodes@illinois.edu
3315 Beckman Institute
217-265-0021

Associate Professor
PEEC

Rstumpf Stumpf,  Rebecca

rstumpf@illinois.edu
Department of Anthropology
217-333-8072

Professor
PEEC

Rwhitakr Whitaker,  Rachel

rwhitakr@illinois.edu
C222 Chemical and Life Sciences Laboratory
217-244-8420

Associate Professor
Molecular and Cellular Biology, PEEC